PLEASE NOTE: In order to best serve our clients, our office will remain open for business. To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients and prospective clients the ability to meet with us in person, via telephone or through video conferencing.
PLEASE NOTE: In order to best serve our clients, our office will remain open for business. To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients and prospective clients the ability to meet with us in person, via telephone or through video conferencing.

Many of our North Haven readers know that some years ago, motorcycles had a prominent place in youth culture. There were movies, songs, popular expressions and fashionable clothes that all linked directly or indirectly to life on motorcycles and the exhilarating feel of riding free and fast.

Those days are gone, however. Today’s motorcyclists are often mature, with graying manes tousled as they ride. Though their experience makes them better riders, they must still deal with drivers of cars, trucks and SUVs who too often fail to notice motorcyclists. The result can be a violent motorcycle crash that leaves the rider with serious injuries.

Seasoned riders often have useful safety tips that can help less experienced motorcyclists avoid problems. For instance, a rider who has been around the block a few times understands the importance of riding with motorcyclists you trust and who know how to ride.

Those kinds of bikers typically know the roads and the kinds of traffic likely to be present; knowledge useful in avoiding risky rides. They also provide great examples to learn from and follow, so if you’re new to motorcycles, try to find seasoned riders to show you the ropes.

Other safety tips include the following:

  • Be visible: don’t wear black and brown clothes that will blend you into the background. Bright colors ensure that you’re seen and safer.
  • Get good gloves: we don’t mean expensive gloves, but rather gloves that help you to maintain a secure, comfortable grip at all times.
  • Don’t ride tired: if you’re spending a day (or two) on the road, pull over and rest every 75 to 125 miles. Stop, stretch, reenergize.
  • Maintain distance: if you’re riding in a group, be sure to keep at least a 20 ft. cushion between yourself and other motorcyclists.
  • Curve rule: when you ride into a curve, remember to start on the outside of your lane and as you go through the curve work your way to the inside of the lane and then back to the outside as you exit the curve. This method helps you straight that curve out.

Experienced motorcyclists have many more tips that can help you to stay safe.

Even the best riders can be struck by careless drivers of cars, pick-ups, SUVs and 18-wheelers, however. If you or a loved one has been injured in a motorcycle collision in Connecticut, contact an attorney experienced in personal injury litigation.