PLEASE NOTE: In order to best serve our clients, our office will remain open for business. To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients and prospective clients the ability to meet with us in person, via telephone or through video conferencing.
PLEASE NOTE: In order to best serve our clients, our office will remain open for business. To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients and prospective clients the ability to meet with us in person, via telephone or through video conferencing.

Most people who buy processed food products don’t spend much time looking at the ingredients or nutritional information. Some people don’t even really understand why manufacturers include all of that on the packaging. 

The reason is simple. Some people don’t have the luxury of ignorance when it comes to what they eat. Whether because of a medical condition like diabetes, strict religion-related vegetarianism or food allergies, people often need to know exactly what goes into the things they eat. 

Manufacturers will both list individual ingredients and typically include an allergen statement on products that contain items with a high risk for an allergic reaction such as tree nuts or gluten. Consumers rely on these labels, which is why it can be incredibly dangerous when a food product has a non-declared allergen in it. The manufacturer could wind up liable for injuries or deaths that occur due to unlisted allergens. 

Ocean Spray had to recall cans of juice because of allergen contamination

Certain whole foods, as well as chemical additives, can provoke extreme allergic reactions in a small number of people. Sulfites are a popular preservative that most people handle well, but there are people with serious allergies to sulfites. 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc has just recalled Lot MH0030LPK4 of their Pink Lite Cranberry Juice Drink packaged in 5.5-ounce cans. because a company involved in their production mistakenly added sulfites to the drink, despite the formula and label having no mention of sulfites. Although there haven’t been any reported illnesses, the potential exists for a consumer to have an extreme reaction to a product with an unlabeled allergen in it.