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PLEASE NOTE: In order to best serve our clients, our office will remain open for business. To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients and prospective clients the ability to meet with us in person, via telephone or through video conferencing.

If people are injured in a car accident in Connecticut, their family members typically experience anxiety and struggle to comprehend how such an event could have occurred. They can also be frustrated if the accident happened through no fault of their loved ones. In these types of car accidents, the injured party (or the surviving family of deceased victims) retains the right to seek monetary damages in an effort to ease pain and suffering; this can be done even if the person who caused the crash already died in the accident.

Multiple people are dealing with this situation in Connecticut after an 18-year-old man was driving and had multiple passengers in his vehicle. He is said to have lost control of the car. That’s when he collided with a utility pole.

The man was apparently on his way to a job interview. He was declared brain dead by the hospital and was kept on life support for organ donor purposes. The teenagers who were in the vehicle with him suffered injuries and were transported to the hospital. Authorities expect these passengers to require extensive recovery.

The injured victims and their family members have the right to file personal injury claims against the driver who is deemed to have caused the utility pole collision. If the 18-year-old who drove the vehicle is found to have been disobeying a rule of the road — such as speeding or driving while distracted — this can be used as evidence of driver negligence in a Connecticut personal injury suit. The injured teenagers can sue the deceased driver’s estate, as well as any other owners of the vehicle involved in the collision. If liability is established to the satisfaction of a civil courts hearing lawsuits involving these types of car accidents, claims for monetary damages will then be determined.

Source: wtnh.com, West Haven students cope with deadly crash, Erin Logan, Sept. 23, 2013